How Disney uses RFID and Big Data to delight guests and increase profit

If you could deploy a technology that promises to help you improve your guest experience and streamline your operations, would you?

For Walt Disney Parks and Resorts chairman, Thomas Staggs, the answer is decidedly, “Yes!” For several years, Disney has been developing a platform integrating radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology with large databases and mobile devices that allow the park and guests to automate entry to the park and rides, reserve seats for shows, find photos taken by Disney photographers and even purchase meals. The platform is expected to allow for extensive personalization of the guest experience while streamlining operations and providing data on guest movement and behavior within the park.

You can read reports on Thomas Staggs’ presentation at the D11 Conference on allthingsd.com here and on linkedin.com here.

Why hotels are competing to attract customers who may never check in

Adding ‘life in the lobby’ to ‘putting heads on beds.’

Catching on to the trend set by boutique hotels, mainstream media has picked up on the fact that hotels aren’t just for travelers anymore.

This Boston Globe “Style” article shows some examples of how hotels are hosting events to attract local customers.
Continue reading

New images for Nobu Hong Kong added to ‘Cuisine’

Scott Brooks, our Hong Kong-based commercial photographer, had the pleasure of making the promotional photos for Nobu Hong Kong’s upcoming wine dinner on June 21. Chef Erik Idos has created an eight-course menu showcasing Nobu’s nouveau style Japanese cuisine and the full range of Cloudy Bay wines. In attendance, to introduce each wine pairing, will be Arnaud Mirey, wine ambassador from Moet Hennessy Diageo.

For more information, check out the announcement in Hong Kong Tatler Dining where Scott’s photographs are featured.
Continue reading

Useful links F&B: May 5 – 11, 2013

8 Lessons For Innovation And Success – via Fast Company.
A quick digest of lessons from restaurateur and chef Mario Batali, founder of Babbo, Mozza Restaurant Group and Eataly. Web page contains a video of the interview.

Tim Hortons first LEED® certified Restaurant – via Yahoo! Finance.
Restaurants have an environmental impact on their communities and investing into sustainable design is needed, commendable even, but is LEED® certification meaningful? Is this a trend that designers should watch, or a trial balloon by Tim Hortons to see whether it has any traction with customers?

Operators talk about food-truck business – via Philly.com.
A little insight into the food truck business. Wouldn’t it be great to have some innovative food trucks in Hong Kong?

The World's Most Innovative Restaurant Interiors – via Fast Company Design.
Restaurant design inspiration – a review of the book, Eat Out! Restaurant Design and Food Experiences in Fast Company Design. I love the rustic feel and illustrated meat charts at Fette Sau in Brooklyn as well as the whimsical birdcage illustrations and green wall at Village Green Marquee in Melbourne.

…and finally

An Overlooked Key To Innovation: The Right Sacrifices – via Fast Company Design.
An in-depth review of how Michelin 2-star restaurant, Noma’s devotion to the total customer experience prevents it from achieving the coveted third Michelin Star.

Commissioning photography: comparing apples..

Comparing apples - copyright 2013 Scott Brooks | Imagennix

Photographs often are commodities…

As a former management consultant, I participated in countless competitive bids over the course of 25 years. The norm in our business was to submit a proposal in response to a detailed RFP (request for proposals) that set out the client’s requirements, timing and expected deliverables. These projects spanned many months and often were at the core of company strategy, so there was a lot of attention paid to every detail.

Continue reading

Anti-Abuse Ad Uses Lenticular Printing to Show Alternate Photo to Kids

Some technology from our childhood has also grown up. Do you remember cereal box prizes and the cards we would get sometimes that showed different images depending on the angle that you looked from? Well, PetaPixel recently posted an interesting article on the creative use of lenticular printing to produce street ads that show potential abused children a help line number that their adult minders don’t see. In addition to public awareness messages like this one, I can imagine the potential for a lot of other applications.

via PetaPixel DL Cade · May 04, 2013

Abuse awareness ad

 

Spanish organization the ANAR Foundation (Aid to Children and Adolescents at Risk) recently released a campaign that makes use of photography, and a process called lenticular printing, to send an offer of help to abused children without alerting their abusers, even if they’re walking together.

via PetaPixel: Anti-Abuse Ad Uses Lenticular Printing to Show Alternate Photo to Kids.

The value of a plan: how a detailed photography plan saved my bacon

Wedding promotion photo for W Hotel Hong Kong..Model: Phuong Rouzaire.Makeup Artist: Rhine Wong.Hair Stylist: Tim Wong.Photographer: Imagennix | Scott Brooks.Location: Wet Deck (Scott Brooks)

Fashion wedding promo for W Hong Kong – In mid-February the marketing team at W Hong Kong asked whether I could produce a series of images showcasing the hotel’s facilities, for use in an in-house sales application that would be shown to prospective wedding clients. “Holy crap!,” I said to myself. What an opportunity. Complicating the request was that the only window available for photography was the 4th and 5th of March while the images were needed by the 12th, so they could be used at a wedding expo in the middle of the month. “Sure,” I said out loud, “That won’t be a problem…”

Despite their busy schedules, the hotel’s event and marketing teams worked with me for the next two weeks to select models, book hair and makeup artists, source wardrobe, spec floral arrangements, scout nine locations, approve a shooting plan and reserve rooms and venues, to make “sure” they would be available. The line from Robert Burns’ poem “To a Mouse” provides a fitting description for the two days of photography: “The best laid schemes of mice and men go often awry.”

From emergency hospital visits of key team members in the days leading up to the shoot, to unexpected late-morning swimmers, a wedding party that chose to shoot all of their group portraits in the middle of one of our locations, and a last-minute doubling in the size of an important corporate event, conditions were ripe for a disastrous shoot. If we hadn’t planned down to 30-minute increments, with a detailed shooting plan covering almost 30 scenes across our 9 locations, the project probably would have fallen apart. On the back of a tight plan and the event team’s advance briefing of key hotel staff, we were able to adjust our schedule and complete 85% of the planned shoot within the available shooting window. Disaster averted and a client who was happy to get their finished images in time for the wedding expo. More images are in the gallery Lifestyle.